Concerned about your Digital Rights?

You should be – they are under attack from all sides!

After I signed the petition at
http://action.openrightsgroup.org/ea-campaign/clientcampaign.do?ea.client.id=1422&ea.campaign.id=8227

I received an email from the Open Rights Group, as follows:-

*****
Thank you for taking the time to sign the petition to stop the Government’s Communications Capability Development Programme. If the CCDP is allowed to go ahead, the government would be able to snoop on all our emails and online interactions. As well as being a pointless waste of money, the CCDP also contravenes human rights law.

CCDP is a badly thought out and ill-informed campaign that has large opposition across parliament. A handful of MPs backing the proposal are hoping to sneak it through parliament unnoticed, but the more people know about this, the less likely this is to happen. The attention generated by the article in the Sunday times helping this http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/internet/9090617/Phone-and-email-records-to-be-stored-in-new-spy-plan.html but there are many things you can do to help derail their plans:

* Tell your friends about the petition – at http://bit.ly/stopthesnooping
* Like our facebook page https://www.facebook.com/stopgovtsnooping
* Write to your local MP http://bit.ly/writemp

Now is the time to take action and stop this.

If you want to know more about how CCDP would affect you, you can visit ORG’s wiki Page
http://wiki.openrightsgroup.org/wiki/Communications_Capabilities_Development_Programme

or attend ORGCon where Privacy International will be giving a talk on the issue:
http://www.openrightsgroup.org/orgcon-2012

Thank you,

Jim Killock
Executive Director
*****

The way the law operates at the moment is that to access such data – which is perfectly possible with the systems they already have, and which they do on a regular basis – permission from a magistrate is needed. This should be as much as is allowed, and no more.

To put this in perspective, try to imagine what our situation would be if the Internet did not exist, but there was still the fear of terrorist activity as there is today. Would they insist on recording the addressee of each letter and postcard, and would they insist on opening a letter to discover the name of the sender, if it wasn’t clearly marked on the envelope?

I think not. The Royal Mail has always been sacrosanct.

Then why doesn’t the same concept apply to digital communication? It most certainly should!

OK. I’ve done my bit, now its up to you.

There is an alternative to all this, by the way, but it was never considered to be 100% reliable.
Use a Carrier Pigeon!
(You might think I am joking, but if anybody could use a very lucrative sideline – this could be it!)

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